Over half of Americans are privately insured. The government covers 35% and 9% have no health insurance. The vast majority of private insurance is provided by employers. Medicaid and medicare cover 20 and 14% of Americans. These data are presented in a Marimekko chart and are based on 2015 data from the Kaiser Family Foundation.

US Health Insurance Coverage

Fifty-six percent of Americans, 178 million, are privately insured.  Of these, 156M belong to employer sponsored plans.  Only 22M are covered by non-group plans, including those created by the Affordable care Act.  The government covers 35% or 112M Americans.  Medicaid covers 62M, Medicare 43M and other government plans (e.g., military and Veteran’s Administration) covers another 6M.  The uninsured number 29 million and make up 9% of Americans.  The data from 2015 were compiled by the Kaiser Family Foundation and are presented in the Marimekko chart below:Over half of Americans are privately insured. The government covers 35% and 9% have no health insurance. The vast majority of private insurance is provided by employers. Medicaid and medicare cover 20 and 14% of Americans. These data are presented in a Marimekko chart and are based on 2015 data from the Kaiser Family Foundation.

The data were easy to obtain by downloading a csv file from the KFF website.  I pasted the data into a Marimekko chart in PowerPoint, using the Paste Special Transpose command.  I then categorized the data into three bars–private, government and uninsured.

I added two rows to my datasheet.  In the first, I computed the sum of all my data (e.g., total US population in 2015) and placed it in each column.  I used this row as the denominator to calucalue the percentages that appear in each segment by setting this row to the 100% row in the chart.  In the second, I computed the % of total data row.

I also sorted the bars and series so that the biggest bars were on the left and biggest series on the bottom of each bar.  I scaled the data from KFF to show it in millions on the chart and chose to show the series name, number and percentage in each segment.  For series names, I used the full definitions of each series.  I then showed these full definitions as my legend.  I adjusted my margins to give more space to the legends.  I edited the name in each segment to show just the category name (e.g., employer or Medicaid).  I also adjusted the segment colors so that each bar had contained different shades of the same base color.

Here is a link to the chart in PowerPoint in SlideShare to download the chart and edit using Mekko Graphics.